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Grand Rapids

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LIGHTING THE PILOT LIGHT for GAS LOGS

There are three positions on your safety pilot valve knob – on, pilot and off.


• Off – the gas logs are completely off, no flame and no pilot.


• Pilot – the gas logs have no flame at the main burner but there is a small pilot light which is on. It can usually be seen to the right hand side and towards the back or front of your logs near the main burner. When pilot is lit the logs are ready to run and will turn on when you turn the knob to the “on” position.

If you do not wish to light the pilot every time you run the logs then you would turn the knob to the pilot position when you want to extinguish the flame at the main burner. If you turn the logs off by turning to the “off” position then you will need to relight the pilot next time you use the gas logs.


• On – the gas logs are fully operational with flame at the main burner.

How to Light a Pilot on a Standing Pilot Fireplace

  • Locate the gas control knob. It may be located behind the lower louvers, behind an access panel or in a compartment beneath the firebox or floor. Consult your manual.

  • Check that the gas supply shut off is in the “on position. When the handle is in line with the gas line, the gas supply is on.

  • Remove the fixed glass assembly.

  • If your fireplace has an on/off wall switch or remote control, make sure that it is in the off position.

  • Locate the piezo ignitor button. Push the button to make sure it is sparking.

  • Examine the gas valve. It may have one or two knobs. One knob will be labelled “OFF”, “PILOT” and “ON”. Look for the hash mark which will tell you what position the valve is in.

How to Reset My Fireplace Module

The module on your fireplace may lock-out under certain conditions. When this occurs, the appliance will not ignite or respond to commands. The module will go into lock-out mode by emitting three audible beeps, then continuously displaying a RED/GREEN error code at its status indicator LED.

  • Check the battery tray. Remove batteries if installed. Batteries should only be installed for use during a power outage.

  • Locate the module. Open the decorate screen front. In most cases this module is going to be in the area underneath where all the workings are located. If you own an Escape I30 or Escape I35 firebrick gas insert, open the decorative screen front and the reset switch will be conveniently located to the bottom left corner. It will be a small black toggle switch labeled reset.

How do I clean my fireplace glass?

It is very important to clean your glass after the initial 3 hours of burn time. Failure to do so can cause permanent etching of your glass. It is recommended that you clean your fireplace glass yearly.

  • Make sure your glass is completely cooled. It is also recommended to turn the gas off when servicing your appliance

  • Remove the front face or louvers of your fireplace; carefully remove the glass assembly of your fireplace (following the instructions in your manual) and lay it on a soft surface.

  • Wipe both sides with household glass cleaner (do not use a product with ammonia), using a soft cloth.

IntelliFire TouchTM Pairing 

Answer: Your RC400 has previously been paired to its IFT-ECM (IntelliFire Touch – Electronic Control Module), but the RC400 has lost communication with its IFT-ECM. There are several common causes for this issue:

  • The fireplace was shipped from the factory with IFT-ECM set in ‘OFF’ mode, and/or the Master Reset switch is ‘OFF’.

  • There is no power to the appliance, such as the circuit breaker switched ‘OFF’, or a power outage.

Best Practices for Wood Burning Fireplace installation

The ideal wood-burning fireplace is a pleasure to use. It doesn't smoke when lit or spill cold air and odors when not in use; it doesn't back draft when the kitchen fan is on, and it works well regardless of wind speed or direction. For obvious reasons, everyone involved in putting fireplaces into houses, including manufacturers, architects, builders and installation contractors, want every fireplace to give pleasure and never frustrate the home owner. But sometimes fireplaces don't work well and the results are costly, not only in lost time but in the reputation of everyone concerned.

Over the years the fireplace industry has spent a lot of time and money investigating problems and working to improve fireplace performance. We now know how to prevent problems through effective installation design. This paper provides a concise overview of the characteristics of good design. But before getting to he details of best practices for integrating fireplaces into today's houses, there is one essential fact you need to know. The most common fireplace problems are difficult and expensive to correct after the fireplace is installed, so the installation design stage is critical to success.